For US Patients Only

No-Touch Relief When Your Skin Is Sensitive to the Touch

People with different kinds of skin conditions that cause itching, redness, dryness, crusting, scaling, inflammation, and discomfort may have sensitive skin. KENALOG Spray is the only topical steroid aerosol spray.1 It gives you relief without having to rub cream or ointment on your sensitive skin.2 Talk to your doctor to see if KENALOG Spray is right for you.

 

Relief is within easy reach

patient-relief

KENALOG Spray makes hard-to-reach areas of your body easy to treat because it can be sprayed at any angle.1

No rubbing or greasy residue

KENALOG Spray works as well as creams, ointments, foams, and other sprays, without the need to rub into skin. With KENALOG Spray, you get true no-touch relief without any messy, greasy residue.2

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS AND USAGE: KENALOG Spray (Triamcinolone Acetonide Topical Aerosol, USP) is indicated for relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses.

SUMMARY OF RISK INFORMATION FOR KENALOG SPRAY

CONTRAINDICATIONS: Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in those patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the preparations.

PRECAUTIONS: Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients.

Conditions which augment systemic absorption include the application of the more potent steroids, use over large surface area, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings.

Patients receiving a large dose of any topical steroid applied to a large surface area or under an occlusive dressing should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression.

Children may absorb proportionally larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus be more susceptible to systemic toxicity. If irritation develops, topical corticosteroids should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Pediatric patients may demonstrate greater susceptibility to topical corticosteroid-induced HPA axis suppression and Cushing’s syndrome than mature patients because of a larger skin surface area to body weight ratio.

Caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

This preparation is not for ophthalmic, oral, or intravaginal use.
For topical use only. Please see Full Prescribing Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.
References: 1. Fowler J Jr, Fowler L. Physician and patient assessment of triamcinolone acetonide spray for steroid-responsive dermatoses. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2010;3(5):29-33. 2. A Phase IV Open Label Evaluation of the No-Rub Moisturizing Properties of Kenalog Spray. Data on file. Jacksonville, FL: Ranbaxy Laboratories Inc.; 2013.
KENALOG is a licensed trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Important Safety Information

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS AND USAGE: KENALOG Spray (Triamcinolone Acetonide Topical Aerosol, USP) is indicated for relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses.

SUMMARY OF RISK INFORMATION FOR KENALOG SPRAY

CONTRAINDICATIONS: Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in those patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the preparations.

PRECAUTIONS: Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients.

Conditions which augment systemic absorption include the application of the more potent steroids, use over large surface area, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings.

Patients receiving a large dose of any topical steroid applied to a large surface area or under an occlusive dressing should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression.

Children may absorb proportionally larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus be more susceptible to systemic toxicity. If irritation develops, topical corticosteroids should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Pediatric patients may demonstrate greater susceptibility to topical corticosteroid-induced HPA axis suppression and Cushing’s syndrome than mature patients because of a larger skin surface area to body weight ratio.

Caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

This preparation is not for ophthalmic, oral, or intravaginal use.
For topical use only. Please see Full Prescribing Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.